International Relations Major, Thucydides
1 week ago
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THESIS TIME!

Sorry for the lack of posts recently. I’ll be turning my senior thesis in exactly a week from today, so this is my life at the moment:

As always, feel free to submit memes or posts related to IR!

3 weeks ago
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globalvoices:

Don’t give it to a Russian

A creative boycott is drawing the attention of Russian Internet users. Ukrainian women are organizing a new campaign called “Don’t give it to a Russian”—a sex embargo against Russian men.

Ukrainian Women’s Sex Boycott Against Russian Men

And more from the Atlantic:

Of course, the women of ”Don’t Give It to a Russian” are hardly the first to have this idea. Just last month, a group of women in Tokyo threatened not to sleep with any man who voted for a gubernatorial candidate who was seen to have outdated views on gender. In 2003, a group called the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace led a sex strike for an end to the Liberian civil war. And just a few years ago in Ukraine, the feminist group Femen called on the wives and girlfriends of the members of the prime minister’s cabinet to boycott sex in opposition to what they called the prime minister’s ”caddish and humiliating attitude towards Ukrainian women.”

It is, in fact, a strategy as old as time. In the Greek comedy Lysistrata, the eponymous character rallies her fellow women to withhold sex from their husbands until they agree to end the Peloponnesian War. For what it’s worth, it worked for the women in the play.

Cite Arrow via globalvoices
3 weeks ago
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maptacular:

Ukraine maps chart Crimea’s troubled past
If Crimea were to join Russia after the planned referendum on 17 March, it would be the latest of many changes to the map of Ukraine during the country’s troubled past.
Passions are being fired by history, as the old maps in the British Library's collection reveal.
See many more maps at BBC.com

maptacular:

Ukraine maps chart Crimea’s troubled past

If Crimea were to join Russia after the planned referendum on 17 March, it would be the latest of many changes to the map of Ukraine during the country’s troubled past.

Passions are being fired by history, as the old maps in the British Library's collection reveal.

See many more maps at BBC.com

Cite Arrow via waltwendtwaltzing
1 month ago
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foreignaffairsmagazine:

In India, conservatives have it wrong: it is homophobia, not homosexuality, that is a foreign import. http://fam.ag/1cJxXOG

foreignaffairsmagazine:

In India, conservatives have it wrong: it is homophobia, not homosexuality, that is a foreign import. http://fam.ag/1cJxXOG

Cite Arrow via foreignaffairsmagazine
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waltwendtwaltzing:

explore-blog:

Christoph Niemann's artwork exploring commoditized warfare for MoMA's Design and Violence is, as expected, absolutely brilliant.

Pair with Niemann’s equally ingenious Abstract City

This one is charmingly horrifying:

CS_04skidrone

Cite Arrow via waltwendtwaltzing
1 month ago
1 month ago
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theatlantic:

Rapping for Democracy in Afghanistan

Seventy percent of the country’s population is under 25. Can music make them interested in politics?

Read more.

Cite Arrow via theatlantic
1 month ago
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For a great many people, in the past and in the present, it is hard to resist the thrill of war fever, the excitement of ‘seriousness,’ and the call of history—the romance of the iceberg even as it sinks the boat. »Adam Gopnik on Crimea and the hysteria of history: http://nyr.kr/1f8dQsT (via newyorker)
Cite Arrow via newyorker
1 month ago
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theatlantic:
In Ukraine, We’re Witnessing What Comes After the War on Terror
In 1990, the University of Chicago’s John Mearsheimer published an essay entitled “Back to the Future,” in which he predicted a new “multipolar” competition resembling the one that held sway in the 19th century. This competition, Mearsheimer predicted, would be less ideological than the Cold War, but more unstable, and might plunge Europe into war. It didn’t happen. To the contrary, NATO—having won the Cold War—expanded, and no adversary rose to challenge it. This absence of great-power strife enabled the massive exchange of money, people, culture, and ideas dubbed “globalization.” Even after 9/11, the era of relative great-power harmony endured as the world’s strongest countries largely cooperated against terrorism.
Read more. [Image: Reuters/Ina Fassbender]

theatlantic:

In Ukraine, We’re Witnessing What Comes After the War on Terror

In 1990, the University of Chicago’s John Mearsheimer published an essay entitled “Back to the Future,” in which he predicted a new “multipolar” competition resembling the one that held sway in the 19th century. This competition, Mearsheimer predicted, would be less ideological than the Cold War, but more unstable, and might plunge Europe into war. It didn’t happen. To the contrary, NATO—having won the Cold War—expanded, and no adversary rose to challenge it. This absence of great-power strife enabled the massive exchange of money, people, culture, and ideas dubbed “globalization.” Even after 9/11, the era of relative great-power harmony endured as the world’s strongest countries largely cooperated against terrorism.

Read more. [Image: Reuters/Ina Fassbender]

Cite Arrow via theatlantic
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