pol102:

globalpost:

BANGKOK, Thailand — They materialize suddenly, by the dozens, raising a three-finger salute toward the sky. Then they vanish as quickly as they appear, melting into crowds to evade scores of armed troops and police.

They are Bangkok’s anti-coup flash mobs. Under Thailand’s new military junta, which seized power from an elected government in late May, protesting the armed takeover is a crime.

Those daring enough to defy the coup have been reduced to cat-and-mouse games — swift public demonstrations designed to evaporate before police or soldiers can haul off offenders.

The flash mobs’ three-finger salute is inspired by The Hunger Games, the popular science-fiction series depicting a futuristic totalitarian regime. In The Hunger Games series, dissent toward a cruel dictatorship is signaled by raising three fingers; in Bangkok, the salute draws an unflattering comparison to the real-life junta that just seized power.

Bangkok’s anti-coup flash mobs have adopted the ‘Hunger Games’ salute

Photos by AFP/Getty Images

It’s always fascinating when pop culture meets reality.

A Summit Without Russia Needs a Drink to Match
From the NYT’s Upshot (h/t Jacob): 
The G7 summit that will start next Wednesday in Brussels was supposed to be a G8 summit and was supposed to be held in Sochi, Russia. So this week’s Upshot With a Twist replaces the Moscow Mule with a more characteristically Belgian cocktail for the relocated and reduced meeting.
A Moscow Mule is vodka, ginger beer and lime. To replace it, we sought a vodka-free drink that would combine ginger and citrus with genever, a juniper-flavored spirit that was the precursor to gin and that remains popular in Belgium and the Netherlands.
I put this request in at Dutch Kills, a bar in Long Island City, Queens, and was presented with the Holland Bee Sting. It’s a drink that combines genever, lemon juice, ginger and honey syrups, and Amaro CioCiaro, a bittersweet orange liqueur.
The drink (a variation on Sam Ross’s Penicillin) provides a refreshing burst of ginger and citrus, yet is also boozier than a Moscow Mule — welcome news for world leaders coping with the Ukraine crisis.
Jan Warren, the head bartender at Dutch Kills, provides the recipe below, or you can visit the bar from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. daily at 27-24 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City.
The Holland Bee Sting
2 oz. genever
3/4 oz. lemon juice
3/8 oz. ginger syrup
3/8 oz. honey syrup
1/4 oz. Amaro CioCiaro
Add all but the Amaro to a shaker, shake with ice, and strain over ice into a double rocks glass. Float the Amaro over the drink — don’t worry, it sinks.

A Summit Without Russia Needs a Drink to Match

From the NYT’s Upshot (h/t Jacob):

The G7 summit that will start next Wednesday in Brussels was supposed to be a G8 summit and was supposed to be held in Sochi, Russia. So this week’s Upshot With a Twist replaces the Moscow Mule with a more characteristically Belgian cocktail for the relocated and reduced meeting.

A Moscow Mule is vodka, ginger beer and lime. To replace it, we sought a vodka-free drink that would combine ginger and citrus with genever, a juniper-flavored spirit that was the precursor to gin and that remains popular in Belgium and the Netherlands.

I put this request in at Dutch Kills, a bar in Long Island City, Queens, and was presented with the Holland Bee Sting. It’s a drink that combines genever, lemon juice, ginger and honey syrups, and Amaro CioCiaro, a bittersweet orange liqueur.

The drink (a variation on Sam Ross’s Penicillin) provides a refreshing burst of ginger and citrus, yet is also boozier than a Moscow Mule — welcome news for world leaders coping with the Ukraine crisis.

Jan Warren, the head bartender at Dutch Kills, provides the recipe below, or you can visit the bar from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. daily at 27-24 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City.

The Holland Bee Sting

2 oz. genever

3/4 oz. lemon juice

3/8 oz. ginger syrup

3/8 oz. honey syrup

1/4 oz. Amaro CioCiaro

Add all but the Amaro to a shaker, shake with ice, and strain over ice into a double rocks glass. Float the Amaro over the drink — don’t worry, it sinks.

g8 g7 russia drinks cocktail international relations

Meet Foreign Policy Interrupted

Madeline Albright, former U.S. secretary of state, arrives in London on December 5, 2005. (Hird/Courtesy Reuters)

“My motto…for young and medium-aged women is that we have to learn to interrupt because you don’t get called on just because people think you should be. You have to have some thoughts and interrupt.”
Madeleine Albright

From CFR:

Elmira Bayrasli and Lauren Bohn are co-founders of Foreign Policy Interrupted, an important and unprecedented new initiative that aims to increase the number of female voices in foreign policy. Working from the ground up through a cohesive fellowship program, including media training and meaningful mentoring at partnering media institutions, FPI helps women break both internal and external barriers to more and better representation in and on the media.

"I’m a journalist, so I’ve encountered the disparity from a couple of angles. I’ve been reporting on the ground in the Middle East for the past three years and it’s interesting because the press corps in the region is largely female. Just yesterday, ahead of Egypt’s voting on a new constitution, I compiled a list of female journalists on the ground to follow on Twitter. There are tons. Yet when it comes to the analysis side of things, we don’t see as many women being positioned or positioning themselves, as expert voices. When producing a piece, I always try to include the opinions of female analysts, and women who are doing great work on the issues, but they’re typically a bit more reticent to assert their opinions than men.”

Subscribe here: http://fpinterrupted.com/

(h/t Colleen)

women female empowerment foreign affairs foreign policy international relations journalism

THESIS TIME!

Sorry for the lack of posts recently. I’ll be turning my senior thesis in exactly a week from today, so this is my life at the moment:

As always, feel free to submit memes or posts related to IR!

thesis submit

globalvoices:

Don’t give it to a Russian

A creative boycott is drawing the attention of Russian Internet users. Ukrainian women are organizing a new campaign called “Don’t give it to a Russian”—a sex embargo against Russian men.

Ukrainian Women’s Sex Boycott Against Russian Men

And more from the Atlantic:

Of course, the women of ”Don’t Give It to a Russian” are hardly the first to have this idea. Just last month, a group of women in Tokyo threatened not to sleep with any man who voted for a gubernatorial candidate who was seen to have outdated views on gender. In 2003, a group called the Women of Liberia Mass Action for Peace led a sex strike for an end to the Liberian civil war. And just a few years ago in Ukraine, the feminist group Femen called on the wives and girlfriends of the members of the prime minister’s cabinet to boycott sex in opposition to what they called the prime minister’s ”caddish and humiliating attitude towards Ukrainian women.”

It is, in fact, a strategy as old as time. In the Greek comedy Lysistrata, the eponymous character rallies her fellow women to withhold sex from their husbands until they agree to end the Peloponnesian War. For what it’s worth, it worked for the women in the play.

ukraine russia crimea women sex

maptacular:

Ukraine maps chart Crimea’s troubled past
If Crimea were to join Russia after the planned referendum on 17 March, it would be the latest of many changes to the map of Ukraine during the country’s troubled past.
Passions are being fired by history, as the old maps in the British Library's collection reveal.
See many more maps at BBC.com

maptacular:

Ukraine maps chart Crimea’s troubled past

If Crimea were to join Russia after the planned referendum on 17 March, it would be the latest of many changes to the map of Ukraine during the country’s troubled past.

Passions are being fired by history, as the old maps in the British Library's collection reveal.

See many more maps at BBC.com

(via waltwendtwaltzing)

map maps ukraine crimea bbc