International Relations Major, Thucydides
1 month ago
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A glance into geopolitics via soccer/futbol. As the NYT explains: 

Politics, geography and good old schadenfreude seem to play a strong role in rooting. A plurality of Mexican respondents named the United States as their least-favorite team. Brazilians chose Argentines, and vice versa. Greeks named their bankers: both Germany and the United States. Elsewhere in Europe, the wounds of an old war seem long forgotten; few fans named Germany as their most disliked team. In Asia, by contrast, Japan and South Korea do not like each other. The United States, Argentina and Iran each have more than their share of haters around the world.
…
A small but noticeable minority of people are ready for the World Cup to end before it has begun. Asked to name their least-favorite team, a plurality of Brazilian respondents (34 percent) named Argentina. But second on the list? Brazil itself. Almost 7 percent of respondents in Brazil will be rooting hard against the home team. That unusual level of home-team dissatisfaction may relate to the recent political turmoil in Brazil. Similarly, 7 percent of French and 5 percent of Americans report rooting against the home team.

Also a good article for anyone interested in Latin American futbol politics: 

Simon Romero (The Times’s Brazil bureau chief, who has reported widely in Latin America) and Jonathan Gilbert (a reporter based in Buenos Aires) look at why so many fans in other countries seem to be rooting against Argentina — and how Argentines feel about it.

A glance into geopolitics via soccer/futbol. As the NYT explains

Politics, geography and good old schadenfreude seem to play a strong role in rooting. A plurality of Mexican respondents named the United States as their least-favorite team. Brazilians chose Argentines, and vice versa. Greeks named their bankers: both Germany and the United States. Elsewhere in Europe, the wounds of an old war seem long forgotten; few fans named Germany as their most disliked team. In Asia, by contrast, Japan and South Korea do not like each other. The United States, Argentina and Iran each have more than their share of haters around the world.

A small but noticeable minority of people are ready for the World Cup to end before it has begun. Asked to name their least-favorite team, a plurality of Brazilian respondents (34 percent) named Argentina. But second on the list? Brazil itself. Almost 7 percent of respondents in Brazil will be rooting hard against the home team. That unusual level of home-team dissatisfaction may relate to the recent political turmoil in Brazil. Similarly, 7 percent of French and 5 percent of Americans report rooting against the home team.

Also a good article for anyone interested in Latin American futbol politics: 

Simon Romero (The Times’s Brazil bureau chief, who has reported widely in Latin America) and Jonathan Gilbert (a reporter based in Buenos Aires) look at why so many fans in other countries seem to be rooting against Argentina — and how Argentines feel about it.

Cite Arrow via nevver
8 months ago
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pol102:

csmonitor:

Brazil’s Bolsa Familia: Welfare model or menace?
Big change for a buck? Latin America says ‘yes’
A welfare check under fire in Brazil

I’ve already added this to my Latin America politics syllabus for the future (along with more non-“scholarly” articles). I may add it to my intro to comparative politics syllabus, too.
Few comparative politics courses cover social policy. They should. We could learn a lot from the mistakes and successes of other countries. And, IMO, bolsa familia is a great success.

pol102:

csmonitor:

Brazil’s Bolsa Familia: Welfare model or menace?

Big change for a buck? Latin America says ‘yes’

A welfare check under fire in Brazil

I’ve already added this to my Latin America politics syllabus for the future (along with more non-“scholarly” articles). I may add it to my intro to comparative politics syllabus, too.

Few comparative politics courses cover social policy. They should. We could learn a lot from the mistakes and successes of other countries. And, IMO, bolsa familia is a great success.

Cite Arrow via pol102
1 year ago
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globalvoices:

Is it vandalism to confront a barrier? But what’s the point to demonstrate so far away from the stadium? 

It was another day to wear green and yellow t-shirts in the streets of Brazil, but for very different reasons.

For some, the national colors were to root for the home team. For others, the shirts were to demand for political and social changes and to face theviolence of military police.

On the same day that Brazil’s national football team secured a place in the Confederations Cup final, protests occurred in at least 18 cities [pt] on Wednesday, 26 June. Outside the Mineirão Stadium in Belo Horizonte city, where Brazil beat Uruguay 2-1, nearly 40,000 [pt] gathered for a protest organized by the Comitê Popular dos Atingidos pela Copa (Popular Committee for People Affected by the Cup), known asCOPAC, and joined [pt] by other social movements such as the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (Landless Worker Movement) and the Movimento Atingidos por Barragens (People Affected by the Dam Movement).

Brazil: A Nation Divided Between Protests and Football

Cite Arrow via globalvoices
1 year ago
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newyorker:

“This isn’t about the twenty cents anymore. It’s something much bigger.”
A slideshow of photos by João Pina of this week’s escalating protests in Brazil: http://nyr.kr/10DTv9F

newyorker:

“This isn’t about the twenty cents anymore. It’s something much bigger.”


A slideshow of photos by João Pina of this week’s escalating protests in Brazil: http://nyr.kr/10DTv9F

Cite Arrow via newyorker
1 year ago
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Catching “If I Catch You”

Looking at Brazil’s growth through the rise of “Ai, Se Eu Te Pego,” by Bryan McCann, fabulous Georgetown professor. (h/t to Sam!)

This is the Brazilian cultural industry at its most potent: its pop wizards have several decades of practice in capturing a hint of the deepest flavors in Brazilian music and swirling them in the cauldron of sweet confection, emerging with pop that still has some connection to roots.

It helps that Teló is telegenic, but within Brazil, it helps even more that he is country. Over the past twenty years Brazil’s middle class has grown from a small sliver of the population to a substantial base. That growth stems from booming agribusiness—frozen chicken, concentrated orange-juice, sugar cane refined into ethanol. Is it an accident that Teló’s value-added country-pop bears such striking similarities to these market-ready commodities?

The new middle-class not only depends on agribusiness, it is based in the countryside. Twenty-five years ago, the rural interior of Teló’s home-state of Paraná was about as culturally compelling as southern Indiana, and the countryside of Mato Grosso, where his career eventually took off, was an impoverished backland known primarily for intractable malaria. Today, you can walk into a café in Medianeira, Paraná or Conquista d’Oeste, Mato Grosso and expect global niceties like wi-fi, espresso, and drizzled vinaigrette. But the sound system will mostly be playing sertaneja-pop, because this class emergence is defined by staking a claim to belonging, rather than imitating outsiders, whether from Los Angeles or Rio de Janeiro. “Ai, Se Eu Te Pego” was tailor-made for this audience and its taste for uncomplicated pleasures that subordinate coastal influence to the comforting taste of home.

The global spread of “Ai, Se Eu Te Pego,” meanwhile, reflects the current enthusiasm for all things Brazilian, from Neymar (bicycle kicks) to Embraer (regional jets). This is why Brazil was awarded both the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro: the green-and-yellow sells well these days. “Ai, Se Eu Te Pego” does not have enough staying power to take us all the way through the World Cup, but you can bet it will generate a new legion of Brazilophiles and spawn a new burst of accordion pop between now and then. Michel Teló has one-hit wonder written all over him, but what a hit. C’mon. “Nossa, nossa, assim você me mata.” “Goodness, gracious, looking that way you kill me.” You know you love it.

Read the whole article at PopMatters.

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