thepoliticalnotebook:

Check out this brief on political science assessments of the Syrian civil war, compiled by the Project on Middle East Political Science. It contains 18 memos by some very good scholars of conflict, insurgency and civil war about different aspects of the Syrian war and prospects for its future trajectory. 
A summary of the findings at Foreign Policy.
[PDF]

Holiday break reading!

thepoliticalnotebook:

Check out this brief on political science assessments of the Syrian civil war, compiled by the Project on Middle East Political Science. It contains 18 memos by some very good scholars of conflict, insurgency and civil war about different aspects of the Syrian war and prospects for its future trajectory. 

A summary of the findings at Foreign Policy.

[PDF]

Holiday break reading!

Syria

newyorker:

While covering the Syrian refugee crisis earlier this year, the photographer Elena Dorfman was drawn most strongly to the teen-agers, who “all talked about missing out on lives, on futures that now seem lost.” Take a look at a powerful audio slide show featuring a small fraction of the population disproportionately affected by the war: http://nyr.kr/1aVzFXA
Photographs by Elena Dorfman.

newyorker:

While covering the Syrian refugee crisis earlier this year, the photographer Elena Dorfman was drawn most strongly to the teen-agers, who “all talked about missing out on lives, on futures that now seem lost.” Take a look at a powerful audio slide show featuring a small fraction of the population disproportionately affected by the war: http://nyr.kr/1aVzFXA

Photographs by Elena Dorfman.

(Source: newyorker.com)

syria

globalvoices:


[Dictators, in general] are fearful of art and music, because it’s the search for truth and beauty. If I spoke my truth then, I would be killed, tortured or deported.

When Syrians took to the streets in March 2011, they rebelled not only against the ruling Assad family, but also against the obscurantism that had been imposed on them for decades. Art as a whole, and music in particular, have played a crucial role in the paradigm shift that has accompanied the revolution, as Syrians discover their voices for the first time.
Syria Untold spoke to renowned composer and pianist Malek Jandali about the emergence of new forms of art and music in Syria. Jandali, who composed the song “Watani Ana” (My Homeland) at the start of the revolution, told us what he considers to be his personal contribution to his country: Music for freedom and justice, music for a new Syria.
Syrian Pianist Malek Jandali: “We Need Freedom for True Art”

globalvoices:

[Dictators, in general] are fearful of art and music, because it’s the search for truth and beauty. If I spoke my truth then, I would be killed, tortured or deported.

When Syrians took to the streets in March 2011, they rebelled not only against the ruling Assad family, but also against the obscurantism that had been imposed on them for decades. Art as a whole, and music in particular, have played a crucial role in the paradigm shift that has accompanied the revolution, as Syrians discover their voices for the first time.

Syria Untold spoke to renowned composer and pianist Malek Jandali about the emergence of new forms of art and music in Syria. Jandali, who composed the song “Watani Ana” (My Homeland) at the start of the revolution, told us what he considers to be his personal contribution to his country: Music for freedom and justice, music for a new Syria.

Syrian Pianist Malek Jandali: “We Need Freedom for True Art”

Syria art culture

theatlantic:

In Focus: Syria in Ruins

While much of the world’s attention focuses on a possible war with North Korea, the war currently being fought in Syria grinds on. March of 2013 was a month of grim milestones in Syria. It marked two years since the start of hostilities; the number of war refugees passed one million; and it was was the bloodiest month to date, with more than 6,000 people killed. Neither the pro-Assad forces, nor the group of rebels opposing them have gained much ground recently, and little or no progress has been made by international agencies to halt the bloodshed. The following photographs come from across Syria, taken over the past six weeks, showing just some of the devastation in Aleppo, Deir al-Zor, Homs, Deraa, Idlib, and Damascus.
See more. [Images: AP, Getty, Reuters]

theatlantic:

In Focus: Syria in Ruins

While much of the world’s attention focuses on a possible war with North Korea, the war currently being fought in Syria grinds on. March of 2013 was a month of grim milestones in Syria. It marked two years since the start of hostilities; the number of war refugees passed one million; and it was was the bloodiest month to date, with more than 6,000 people killed. Neither the pro-Assad forces, nor the group of rebels opposing them have gained much ground recently, and little or no progress has been made by international agencies to halt the bloodshed. The following photographs come from across Syria, taken over the past six weeks, showing just some of the devastation in Aleppo, Deir al-Zor, Homs, Deraa, Idlib, and Damascus.

See more. [Images: AP, Getty, Reuters]

syria

theatlantic:

DIY Weapons of the Syrian Rebels

Nearly two years after the start of Syria’s popular uprising, the conflict has evolved into a slow-moving, brutal civil war with many players and no clear end in sight. Multiple rebel groups across the country continue to fight President Bashar al-Assad’s forces, using any weapons they can get their hands on. While the rebels are using many modern weapons, they’ve also come up with their own makeshift solutions. In these weapons workshops, anti-aircraft guns are welded to pickup trucks and armor shields are attached to machine guns and cars. Mortar shell nose cones are turned on lathes and explosives are mixed by hand. Homemade grenades are launched by jury-rigged shotguns or giant slingshots in the urban battlefields of Aleppo and Damascus. Gathered here are a few examples of the hand-built munitions of the Syrian rebels.

See more. [Images: AP, Getty, Reuters]

syria

CFR Daily Brief on Syria

Council on Foreign Relations

Daily News Brief
July 19, 2012

Syrian Government, Rebels Battle in Damascus

Violent clashes between the Syrian army and opposition forces (al-Jazeera) continued today in the capital of Damascus, a day after a suspected suicide bombing killed three of President Bashar al-Assad’s top military officers. It was the first such attack on the core of the Syrian regime, suggesting a potential turning point in the rebels’ sixteen-month anti-government uprising. Meanwhile, the UN Security Council (CNN) is set to debate and vote on a Western-backed resolution mandating new sanctions on Assad if he fails to halt his crackdown on the opposition, a move that Russia and China are expected to veto.

Analysis

"After more than a year of being shelled by the regime’s well-equipped military and terrorized by gangs of pro-regime military thugs, the Syrian rebels’ attack was the equivalent of blowing up the Death Star: They not only decapitated the Assad regime’s top security officials, they sent a message that they could reach anyone—and any part of the country. Even if the belief that Assad could fall any day is overblown, it is clear that his hold on power is shakier than ever,” writes Mitchell Prothero for ForeignPolicy.com.

"What is clear is that any chance that the United States and other Western powers could still facilitate a diplomatic solution is rapidly fading, largely because of months of Russian intransigence. Everyone’s concern should be the thousands of Syrian civilians who have died at Mr. Assad’s hand and the thousands more still hounded by his security forces with helicopters and tanks,” says this New York Times editorial.

"Still, there is a long history of rebel groups breaching a capital city, or even killing top regime officials, and ultimately losing. Three of the bloodiest, nastiest civil wars of the 1990s saw days like today, and all three ended with the government staying in power and the rebels, for all their bombings and advances, defeated,” writes the Atlantic's Max Fisher.

council on foreign relations syria assad death star foreign policy new york times atlantic