International Relations Major, Thucydides
1 year ago
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theatlantic:

In Focus: Mali Conflict Enters New Phase

The president of France, Francois Hollande, has said that French troops are in the “final phase” of their fight against separatist and Islamic groups who had taken control of most of northern Mali. This new phase, beginning just more than a month after the French military intervened, has been marked by at least two suicide bomb attacks, and the start of guerrilla warfare, after the militant groups retreated into Mali’s wild countryside. France has announced plans to pull out in March, leaving the management of the conflict to the Malian military and allied West African nations, primarily Chad and Nigeria. Gathered here are images from the past few weeks of the ongoing conflict in Mali.

See more. [Image: AP, Getty, Reuters]

Cite Arrow via theatlantic
1 year ago
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theatlantic:

In Focus: The Conflict in Mali

Two weeks ago, the French military launched Operation Serval, intervening in a complicated, months-old conflict in northern Mali. A year earlier, Tuareg rebels had attacked government positions throughout northern Mali, temporarily seizing control of a large area and declaring it a new state named Azawad. The rebels soon lost control though, displaced by several Islamist groups, including elements of Al Qaeda, intent on imposing Sharia law in the region and possibly establishing a base for terrorist activity. Those militant groups began pushing south recently, prompting a planned U.N. action, but France felt compelled to act sooner than anticipated, to prevent further damaging gains. More than 2,000 French troops are now involved in Mali, pursuing and attacking anti-government forces from the air and ground, with support from nine other western countries and several neighboring African nations.

See more. [Images: AP, Getty, Reuters]

Cite Arrow via theatlantic
2 years ago
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theatlantic:

It’s Not Just Newspapers: Circulation Tanks at Al-Qaeda’s Magazine

In June 2010, members of the vibrant online jihadist community launched al-Qaeda’s first-ever English-language magazine. The premier issue of Inspire was glossy (or it would be if you printed the downloadable PDF, at least), filled with color photos and languid essays on the Great Satan, and a bombshell in the Western media, which relished the opportunity to see the world through the eyes of al-Qaeda propagandists.Bad news, however, for the editors hiding out in Yemen or Pakistan or wherever they might happen to be: Inspire, like so many newspapers and magazines here in the U.S., has seen its readership absolutely crater, judging by the download rates at jihadist site Tawhed. 
Read more. [Image: Derek Thompson]


“Foreign Policy's Blake Hounshell jokingly summed this up, 'So, droning their editors is a winning strategy?’”

theatlantic:

It’s Not Just Newspapers: Circulation Tanks at Al-Qaeda’s Magazine

In June 2010, members of the vibrant online jihadist community launched al-Qaeda’s first-ever English-language magazine. The premier issue of Inspire was glossy (or it would be if you printed the downloadable PDF, at least), filled with color photos and languid essays on the Great Satan, and a bombshell in the Western media, which relished the opportunity to see the world through the eyes of al-Qaeda propagandists.

Bad news, however, for the editors hiding out in Yemen or Pakistan or wherever they might happen to be: Inspire, like so many newspapers and magazines here in the U.S., has seen its readership absolutely crater, judging by the download rates at jihadist site Tawhed

Read more. [Image: Derek Thompson]

Foreign Policy's Blake Hounshell jokingly summed this up, 'So, droning their editors is a winning strategy?’”

Cite Arrow via theatlantic
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